October 6, 2022

‘1,000 Black Girl Books’ book clubs promote diversity through literacy

A program in Martin County aims to inspire young girls of color to read and write by providing them with books they can see themselves in. It’s called 1,000 pounds of black girls. a group of young girls not only build a wealth of knowledge, but also their creativity and imagination by flipping through the pages of books featuring characters that look like them. “I want to read about my color,” Ashaina Griffin, a fifth-grader who attends the 1,000 Black Girl Books book club, said. The book club was introduced to the community center two years ago. director of the Martin County Library System, said. Encomio said local clubs in the county are based on a nationwide campaign started by a then 10-year-old girl named Marley Dais. Her 1,000 Black Girl Books campaign tackles the lack of diversity in required reading in schools. She has since created a database of over 13,000 books where black girls are the main characters. “It’s hugely important for them to be excited to read, to be able to see themselves, to be able to identify with what’s going on in the stories, and to be able to see other authors who may be like them so they can be inspired to write and read themselves,” said Encomio, in Martin County who reach out to underserved youth, including the Hobe Sound BLAST program at Banner Lake Community Center, the East Stuart Program at the Stuart 10th Street Center, and the Indiantown Program at the Bill & Barbara Whitman Boys & Girls Club in Indiantown.The Sound Program is funded by the Hobe Sound Community Chest while the other two are funded by the Community Foundation Martin – St. Lucie.Each girl in the program receives free copies of the books they read, participates in introspective crafts, and each club offers special guest speakers.”We want to make sure we putt s various books available to these specific communities,” Encomio said. In a short time, she said, it has already strengthened these girls’ love of reading. When asked what she was most looking forward to this year, Griffin had one goal in mind: “Read 1,000 books!” More information on the 1,000 Black Girl Books book clubs can be found here. Looking at the World Around Us: WPBF 25 News Forecasting Our Future

A program in Martin County aims to inspire young girls of color to read and write by providing them with books they can see themselves in.

It’s called 1,000 pounds of black girls.

A Moment of Joy: News we love

At the Banner Lake Community Center in Hobe Sound, a group of young girls develop not only a wealth of knowledge, but also their creativity and imagination as they flip through the pages of books featuring characters that look like them.

“I want to read about my color,” said Ashaina Griffin, a fifth-grader who attends the 1,000 Black Girl Books book club.

The book club was started at the community center two years ago.

“We try to highlight books that contain black protagonists,” said Darlene Encomio, literacy outreach manager for the Martin County Library System.

Encomio said local clubs in the county are based on a nationwide campaign started by a then 10-year-old girl named Marley Dais. Her 1,000 Black Girl Books campaign tackles the lack of diversity in required reading in schools.

She has since created a database of over 13,000 books where black girls are the main characters.

“It’s hugely important so they’re excited to read, so they can see themselves, so they can relate to what’s going on in the stories, and so they can see other authors who may be like them so they can be inspired to write and read themselves,” says Encomio.

Do not miss anything: Sign up for WPBF 25 News personalized newsletters and alerts

Currently, the library system has book clubs in three select after-school programs in Martin County that serve underserved youth, including the Hobe Sound BLAST program at Banner Lake Community Center, the East Stuart at the Stuart 10th Street Center and the Indiantown. program at the Bill & Barbara Whitman Boys & Girls Club in Indiantown.

The Hobe Sound program is funded by the Hobe Sound Community Chest while the other two are funded by the Community Foundation Martin – St. Lucie.

Each girl in the program receives free copies of the books she reads, participates in introspective crafts, and each club offers special guest speakers.

“We want to make sure that we make various books available to these specific communities,” Encomio said.

In no time, she said, it had already strengthened these girls’ love of reading.

When asked what she was most looking forward to this year, Griffin had one goal in mind: “Read 1,000 books! »

More information about the 1,000 Black Girl Books book clubs can be found here.

A look at the world around us: WPBF 25 News Forecasting Our Future