The giveaway will help patients connect electronically


TeleHealth Access for Seniors, a fully student-run 501 (c) (3) nonprofit, donated video chat-enabled devices to Cary Medical Center to benefit seniors, veterans and the elderly. low-income populations in the region.

CARIBOU, Maine – TeleHealth Access for Seniors, a fully student-run 501 (c) (3) nonprofit, donated video chat-enabled devices to Cary Medical Center to benefit seniors, veterans and the elderly. low-income populations in the region.

TeleHealth Access for Seniors is a national program currently in place in 26 states. The organization donated over 1,000 devices and raised $ 41,000.

Jay Philbrick, a recent graduate of the Maine School of Science and Mathematics in Limestone, is both the head of the Maine branch of TeleHealth for Seniors as well as the organization’s director of advocacy, urging government officials to support legislation that better promotes and finances telehealth. as part of the national health system.

“We provide these devices for free,” Philbrick said. He explained the advantages of the devices.

“We are providing them to hospitals in Virginia and primary care providers so they can provide telehealth services to veterans and seniors who otherwise would not have been able to access them. This allows these vulnerable people to attend doctor’s appointments from their homes without fear of contracting COVID-19, and to fight the epidemic of loneliness in our country, ”said Philbrick.

According to Philbrick, the organization also provides free technical support and user guides to seniors so they can better benefit from the technology.

“Here in Maine, we’ve raised over 15 devices and over $ 200, and we’ve used our funds to purchase tablets for Cary to enable telehealth services for their elderly patients,” said Philbrick, who has delivered the devices to the hospital.

The COVID-19 pandemic has generated a significant increase in the use of telehealth and telemedicine. David Silsbee, Cary’s chief information officer, said the hospital was delighted to receive the student organization’s donation.

“We have increased the use of telehealth since the start of the pandemic,” Silsbee said.

“We recognize that the cost of these devices may not be affordable for seniors or other low-income people. These students have really created a very special program and we intend to use the devices they have provided for the benefit of the patients we serve, ”said Silsbee.

In addition to the telehealth benefits of donated devices, Silsbee said they could also be used to help patients connect with family members during their hospital stay.

“Due to the COVID 19 crisis, we have had to drastically restrict our visitation policies,” said Silsbee, who served at Cary for more than 40 years. “We will be making some of these devices available to our elderly patients so they can Face-Time and connect with loved ones using technology.”

Emma Raven from North Yarmouth, Clare Boone from Belfast, Sarah Kuptchik from Madawaska and Will Whitman from Swan’s Island work with Philbrick in Maine.

Submitted by the Cary Medical Center Community Relations and Development Office.

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